Yuungnaqpiallerput - The Way We Genuinely Live - Masterworks of Yup'ik Science and Survival

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121 West Seventh Ave.
Anchorage, AK 99501
(907)343-4326

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Qayak

Yuungnaqpiallermek yuucingqerrsulriim piitesciigatqapiarluku qayaq.

A person who wished to live life fully as a Yup'ik person could not be without a kayak.

--Paul John, Toksook Bay

 
 
Men usually searched long and hard for the different pieces of driftwood needed to construct a kayak frame. Even apparently good wood might be rotten inside.
 

David Martin recalled an exceptional experience: "One day I found one log for the construction of a kayak, the kind that they call natlugnerilnguq [one without flaws] with a strong and pliable stump. All the kayak parts could actually be constructed out of one log. The stump was made into the ribs, and the trunk was cut into long lengths and made into side stringers."


Murapiit Spruce DriftwoodRoot

Description

Spruce roots, both raw and split.

Frank Andrew said: "They split them and used them for twine, for kayak bindings, and to bind slate blades to the handles of curved knives. Spruce roots don't rot easily and last a long time as bindings."

Dimensions

L- 18 1/2 in
W- 5 1/4 in
H- 11 1/4 in

Credits

Anchorage Museum

 

Murapiit Spruce DriftwoodStraight Wood

Description

Straight-grained Wood

Frank Andrew said: "These pieces of straight grained wood among all the different kinds of wood are especially useful to make into things."

Dimensions

L- 29 1/4 in
W- 6 3/4 in
H- 4 in

Credits

Anchorage Museum

 

Murapiit Spruce DriftwoodStump

Description

Mimernaq/Tree stump

With natural curve and high resin content that deterred cracking, was ideal for the thicker parts of boat and kayak frames.

Dimensions

L- 31 in
W- 6 in
H- 8 in

Credits

Anchorage Museum

 

Anguarun Single-Bladed PaddleSingle Bladed Paddle

Description

Anguarun/Single-bladed paddle made by Noah Andrew and measuring one yagneq (armspan) from end to end.

Dimensions

l- 65 in
W- 6 in
Diameter- 1 in

Credits

Anchorage Museum Association Acquisition Fund, Anchorage Museum 2007

 

Paangrun Double-Bladed PaddleDouble Bladed Paddle

Description

Double-bladed paddle with Frank Andrew's inherited family design painted on the tip: "Our paddles have it'garuat [pretend feet] for designs. They paint the blade black.

The design isn't obvious but was explained as the feet of the eagle or of a common loon."

Dimensions

L- 92 1/2 in
W- 3 in
Diameter- 1 in

Credits

Anchorage Museum Association Acquisition Fund, Anchorage Museum 2007



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